How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (2022)

Spanish bread is another Filipino bakeryfavorite. Learn how to make these at home.

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Next to pandesal, Spanishbread is my next favorite bakery staple.

I have been makingdifferent recipes from the internet, most of which yielded disappointing rolls.

While the dough wasfine, the filling was not.

Most recipes have youfill the rolls with softened butter, then sprinkle sugar and breadcrumbs. And asthe rolls bake, the filling ooze out.

NOT GOOD!

Until I came to this recipe.

I used my pandesalrecipe for the bread, and used the filling.

HEAVEN.

I have found my Spanishbread.

HAPPINESS!

How to Make Spanish Bread?

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (1)

We start with makingthe dough.

Go and read how to make pandesal dough first. I gave a lot of tips on how to make the best rolls. If you are new to making bread, I strongly suggest you give it a read.

Then come back hereand we will discuss how to make the filling and how to form the rolls.

You’re back and ready to make Spanish bread?

.

Note, that the full recipefor the pandesal will also make 24 Spanish bread. If that is too much, simplyhalve the pandesal recipe. I give you the halved recipe below.

Or do what I usuallydo, make half the dough into pandesal and half into Spanish bread.

Both my favorites madein one go!

But that is me.

I leave you to decide.

First, make the dough.

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (2)

USINGA STAND-MIXER

If using active-dry yeast, activate the yeastfirst. Dissolve theyeast in ¼ cup (60 milliliters) of warm water and 1 teaspoon sugar. Let standfor 5 to 10 minutes. If the mixture starts bubbling and increases in volume,the yeast is active and alive. If not, repeat this step with a new packet ofyeast.

If using instant yeast, mix the yeast directlyinto the flour.

(Video) The Classic Spanish Bread Recipe

Weigh ormeasure out your flour into the bowl of your stand mixer. If using differenttypes of flour, mix well.

Add inthe salt and sugar. Mix on low using the paddle attachment.

Add inthe softened butter and mix on low speed until distributed evenly.

Add inthe instant yeast/activated yeast. Drizzle in the water. Start with 9tablespoons/135 ml (include the water in the yeast mixture in this if you haveactivated the yeast.) If the dough is still too dry, slowly drizzle in more water until the dough is well moistened,but not too wet.

If you have addedtoo much water, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time.

Optional (but highly recommended) step: autolyse.

Cover the bowl and let it rest for atleast 30 minutes and up to an hour.

Changeto the hook attachment and knead for 5 minutes (with autolyse) to about 15 minutes (withoutautolyse.) Then testthe dough by pinching a piece and stretching into a square. If you get a window pane, your dough is ready. If not, continuekneading and testing every 5 minutes.

Once thedough is ready, scrape down and form the dough into a ball. Using the samebowl, cover and set aside for an hour or until it has doubled insize. Set in a warmarea if your kitchen is too cold. In winter, I heat the oven quickly (turn on 1minute at 100°C) and turn off and leave the light on. Then I put the bowl inthe oven.

Or bulk rise in the fridge overnight.

BY HAND

Same note for the yeast as above.

Weigh ormeasure out your flour into the bowl of your stand mixer.

Add inthe salt and sugar. Mix well with a wire whisk.

Add in the butter, and work into theflour with your fingers. To do so, useyour finger tips and rub the flour and butter together.

Once the butter is incorporated, make a well in the middle and add in the water and yeast. Start with 9 tablespoons/135 ml (include thewater in the yeast mixture in this if you have activated the yeast) and mix in with a rubber spatula. If too dry, slowly add in morewater a little at a time until you get a shaggydough.

Cover with a kitchen towel and set asideto autolyse for at least 30 minutes (up to an hour).

After the autolyse, turn out the doughonto your work area and knead for 2 to 5 minutes.

Cover again and set a timer for 30minutes.

After 30 minutes, do a series of stretchand folds.

At this point, you may then continuewith the bulk rise. Set the dough aside for an hour or until it has doubled insize. Set in a warmarea if your kitchen is too cold. In winter, I heat the oven quickly (turn on 1minute at 100°C) and turn off and leave the light on. Then I put the bowl inthe oven.

Or bulk rise in the fridge overnight.

Make the filling for Spanish bread

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (3)

An hour before youwill form the rolls, make the filling.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Addthe flour and cook for a minute. Add the breadcrumbs, milk, sugar, salt. Continue cooking until a thick paste forms.

Set aside in a shallow bowl until cool.

(Video) Best SPANISH BREAD | Extra SOFT | Video with TIPS

Toform the Spanish bread:

Youwill need extra breadcrumbs.

Pre-shape the Spanish bread

Divide the dough into 12 pcs, roughly 44grams each. Roll each piece into a ball and set aside. You do this by tuckingthe dough into the bottom to form a taut ball and then placing the dough onyour work surface and roll around by cupping each dough into your palm.

Here is a videoshowing that:

Place them neatly in a row/rows.

Once all the dough has been pre-shapedinto balls, we will now make the rolls.

Divide the filling into 12. I usually dothis by drawing lines into the filling, kind of like cutting a cake.

Start with the first ball made, shape itinto a flat, inverted triangle using your fingers and the heel of your palm. Get onepiece of filling and spread it out into the middle of the triangle, leaving anedge of about a centimetre unfilled. Roll it tightly, starting at the widerend. Pinch the end to ensure it does not unfurl when baked.

Here is a videoshowing how to shape the Spanish bread:

Coat in the breadcrumbs and arrange on your lined baking sheet seam side down, making sure there is space in between as thesewill still rise. Cover with a dry kitchen towel and let rest until it haspuffed up a bit (but not doubled), 30 minutes to 1 hour (depending on how coldyour kitchen is.)

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (4)

While the rolls are proofing, preheat oven to 375°F/180°C. When the rolls are ready, bake in the oven for 18-20 minutes.

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (5)

Spanish Bread Video

Pin the Spanish Bread Recipe here:

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (6)

Other Filipino Recipes you might like:

Pandesal

Cheese cupcakes

Chiffon cake

Nutrition

Calories

538 cal

Fat

22 g

Carbs

77 g

Protein

9 g

(Video) Spanish Bread Recipe (Senorita Bread) | Filipino Recipes

Click Here For Full Nutrition, Exchanges, and My Plate Info

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (7)

Tweety

Spanish Bread

Spanish bread is a Filipino bakery favorite. This is how to make it at home.

4 hrPrep Time

20 minCook Time

(Video) Filipino Spanish Bread Recipe

4 hr, 20 Total Time

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (8)

How to Make Spanish Bread (Filipino Rolls with a Buttery Sugar Filling) (9)Save Recipe

Print Recipe

Ingredients

    For 12 Spanish Bread Rolls

  • 250 g (around 2 cups) bread flour or all-purpose flour
  • 45 g (3.5 tbsp) granulated sugar
  • 150 g (1/2 cup + 2 tbsp) warm water (around 30°C/86°F is fine)
  • 3.5 grams (1/2 tsp) fine sea salt
  • 50 g (around 3.5 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 3 g (1 tsp) instant yeast or active-dry yeast
  • Filling:

  • ¼ cup (56 g) butter
  • 2 tsp (6g) flour
  • ½ cup (60 g normal bread crumbs OR 35 g panko bread crumbs, blitzed in food processor)
  • 1/2 c not packed (65 g) brown sugar
  • 1/8 tsp (1 g) salt
  • 2 tbsp (30 ml) milk
  • For 24 Spanish Bread Rolls

  • 500 g (around 4 cups) bread flour or all-purpose flour
  • 90 g (7 ¼ tbsp) granulated sugar
  • 300 g (around 1 ¼ cup) warm water (around 30°C/86°F is fine)
  • 7 grams (1 tsp) fine sea salt
  • 100 g (around 7 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 packet (about 2 ¼ teaspoons, 7 grams) instant yeast or active-dry yeast
  • Filling

  • 7 tbsp (100 g) butter
  • 4 tsp (12 g) flour
  • 1 c (120 g normal bread crumbs OR 70g panko bread crumbs, blitzed in food processor)
  • 1/2 c packed (100 g) brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ c (60 ml) milk

Directions

    USING A STAND-MIXER

  1. If using active-dry yeast, activate the yeast first. Dissolve the yeast in ¼ cup (60 milliliters) of warm water and 1 teaspoon sugar. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes. If the mixture starts bubbling and increases in volume, the yeast is active and alive. If not, repeat this step with a new packet of yeast.
  2. If using instant yeast, mix the yeast directly into the flour.
  3. Weigh or measure out your flour into the bowl of your stand mixer. If using different types of flour, mix well.
  4. Add in the salt and sugar. Mix on low using the paddle attachment.
  5. Add in the softened butter and mix on low speed until distributed evenly.
  6. Add in the instant yeast/activated yeast. Drizzle in the water. Start with 9 tablespoons/135 ml (include the water in the yeast mixture in this if you have activated the yeast.) If the dough is still too dry, slowly drizzle in more water until the dough is well moistened, but not too wet.
  7. If you have added too much water, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time.
  8. Optional step: autolyse.

  9. Cover the bowl and let it rest for at least 30 minutes and up to an hour.
  10. Change to the hook attachment and knead for 5 minutes (with autolyse) to about 15 minutes (without autolyse.) Then test the dough by pinching a piece and stretching into a square. If you get a window pane, your dough is ready. If not, continue kneading and testing every 5 minutes.
  11. Once the dough is ready, scrape down and form the dough into a ball. Using the same bowl, cover and set aside for an hour or until it has doubled in size. Set in a warm area if your kitchen is too cold. In winter, I heat the oven quickly (turn on 1 minute at 100°C) and turn off and leave the light on. Then I put the bowl in the oven.
  12. Or bulk rise in the fridge overnight.
  13. BY HAND

  14. Same note for the yeast as above.
  15. Weigh or measure out your flour into the bowl of your stand mixer.
  16. Add in the salt and sugar. Mix well with a wire whisk.
  17. Add in the butter, and work into the flour with your fingers. To do so, use your finger tips and rub the flour and butter together.
  18. Once the butter is incorporated, make a well in the middle and add in the water and yeast. Start with 9 tablespoons/135 ml (include the water in the yeast mixture in this if you have activated the yeast) and mix in with a rubber spatula. If too dry, slowly add in more water a little at a time until you get a shaggy dough.
  19. Cover with a kitchen towel and set aside to autolyse for at least 30 minutes (up to an hour).
  20. After the autolyse, turn out the dough onto your work area and knead for 2 to 5 minutes.
  21. Cover again and set a timer for 30 minutes.
  22. After 30 minutes, do a series of stretch and folds.
  23. At this point, you may then continue with the bulk rise. Set the dough aside for an hour or until it has doubled in size. Set in a warm area if your kitchen is too cold. In winter, I heat the oven quickly (turn on 1 minute at 100°C) and turn off and leave the light on. Then I put the bowl in the oven.
  24. Or bulk rise in the fridge overnight.
  25. Make the filling for Spanish bread

  26. An hour before you will form the rolls, make the filling.
  27. Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Add the flour and cook for a minute. Add the breadcrumbs, milk, sugar, salt. Continue cooking until a thick paste forms.
  28. Set aside in a shallow bowl until cool.
  29. To form the Spanish bread:

  30. You will need extra breadcrumbs.
  31. Pre-shape the Spanish bread
  32. Divide the dough into 12 pcs, roughly 44 grams each. Roll each piece into a ball and set aside. You do this by tucking the dough into the bottom to form a taut ball and then placing the dough on your work surface and roll around by cupping each dough into your palm.
  33. Place them neatly in a row/rows.
  34. Once all the dough has been pre-shaped into balls, we will now make the rolls.
  35. Divide the filling into 12. I usually do this by drawing lines into the filling, kind of like cutting a cake.
  36. Start with the first ball made, shape it into a flat, inverted triangle using your fingers and the heel of your palm. Get one piece of filling and spread it out into the middle of the triangle, leaving an edge of about a centimetre unfilled. Roll it tightly, starting at the wider end. Pinch the end to ensure it does not unfurl when baked.
  37. Coat in the breadcrumbs and arrange on your lined baking sheet seam side down, making sure there is space in between as these will still rise. Cover with a dry kitchen towel and let rest until it has puffed up a bit (but not doubled), 30 minutes to 1 hour (depending on how cold your kitchen is.)
  38. While the rolls are proofing, preheat oven to 375°F/180°C. When the rolls are ready, bake in the oven for 18-20 minutes.

Notes

Prep time includes rise time

7.8.1.2

55

(Video) How To Make Filipino Soft Spanish Bread

ayellowbowl.com

FAQs

What is Spanish bread filling made of? ›

The filling of Spanish bread is made of sugar, breadcrumbs, and butter. Some recipes call for water or milk, flour, sugar, margarine, breadcrumbs, and a pinch of salt.

What is Spanish roll made of? ›

The sweet and buttery filling in this Spanish bread recipe is made of a delicious combination of sugar, breadcrumbs, and margarine. Some versions of this recipe use water or milk, flour, sugar, butter, breadcrumbs, and a little salt. What is there to love about this Spanish bread?

Why is Filipino called Spanish bread? ›

Some people ask why it is called Spanish bread? Yes, there is a connection. This is because Filipinos adopted bread making from Spanish kitchens, and we associated it with many of our meals. Because of our creative minds, we developed different varieties, shapes, and fillings of bread.

What type of bread do the Spanish eat? ›

Since time immemorial, bread (pan in Spanish) is a staple food that accompanies all daily meals, all year round. In fact, the Iberian Peninsula is one of the European regions with the greatest diversity of breads. The simple barra (followed by baguette and ciabatta) is, by far, the most consumed variety of bread (75%).

What is the soft inside of bread called? ›

The soft, inner part of bread is known to bakers and other culinary professionals as the crumb , which is not to be confused with small bits of bread that often fall off, called crumbs.

What is butter roll made of? ›

The ooey-gooey dessert is made up of tender, flaky biscuit dough filled with butter, sprinkled with sugar and nutmeg or cinnamon, rolled into pinwheels, and baked in a rich, creamy sweetened milk sauce. The result is super tender, moist rolls that look like a cinnamon roll, but taste entirely different.

What is the name of Filipino bread? ›

Pan de sal, literally translated as salt bread, is the national bread of the Philippines and while we think we're all initiated with it, there are as many pan de sal varieties as there is adobo.

What is the first Filipino bread? ›

Pandesal
Alternative namesPan de sal
TypeBread
CourseBreakfast
Place of originPhilippines
Main ingredientsFlour, yeast, sugar, salt, oil
2 more rows

What is the best bread in the Philippines? ›

Pandesal – The number one Panaderia Favourite, it is the Filipinos ultimate tinapay a staple during breakfast, it's the cash cow of all bakeries. The name literally means “bread of salt” which refers to the pinch of salt used on the dough, made with few simple ingredients such as flour, water, sugar and milk.

What is the Filipino sweet bread called? ›

Pandesal is the quintessential bread roll of the Philippines. The slightly sweet bread is soft and fluffy. It's best enjoyed with salty cheese or peanut butter.

Is pandesal Filipino or Spanish? ›

Pandesal is the most popular local bread in the Philippines. It is the Spanish term for “salt bread,” since the name originated during the 16th century Spanish colonial era. Most bakeries all over the country, from small backyard establishments to industrial bakeries, produce and sell this bread.

What are two favorite ingredients in Spanish food? ›

In other words, you will always find these ingredients in a Spanish kitchen!
  • 1# Olive Oil: one of the top ingredients of Spanish cuisine. Olive oil: one of the key ingredients of Spanish cuisine. ...
  • #2 Tomatoes: an essentiel ingredient in Spanish cuisine. ...
  • #3 Potatoes. ...
  • #4 Fish and Ham. ...
  • #5 Bread and picos.
17 Apr 2022

What is Spanish bread called? ›

There are four types of loaves – the bolo or hogaza, a misshapen round loaf with small cracks on the upper part and often with a topknot; the rosca, an irregular and flat ring of bread; the bola or torta, which is round and flat; and the barra, a baguette-type loaf.

What is the secret of making bread soft? ›

The first way to soften breads is to add fat somehow. Liquid fats are your best bet from sandwich breads or soft rolls. It could be as easy as replacing some if not all of the water in the recipe with whole milk.

What makes the bread smooth and fluffy? ›

Yeast ferments the sugar present in the dough into carbon dioxide. The CO2 released from the yeast fills the dough and increases its volume. Once, the bread has baked, the heat causes the bubbles to break and makes the bread light and fluffy.

What gives bread its fluffy texture? ›

Carbon dioxide is responsible for all the bubbles that make holes in bread, making it lighter and fluffier. Because gas is created as a result of yeast growth, the more the yeast grows, the more gas in the dough and the more light and airy your bread loaf will be.

Does oil or butter make softer bread? ›

Baking with oil produces moist and tender baked goods.

Because oil is liquid at room temperature, it produces exceptionally moist baked goods. Butter, on the other hand, is solid at room temp, and therefore baked goods made with it are (arguably) a tad more dry.

How can I improve my bread flavor? ›

If you're looking to ramp up the taste of your favorite bread recipe, we recommend adding a bit of fat. A fat like butter, olive oil or coconut oil in small quantities will help your bread achieve a higher rise and it will also boost its flavor by tenfold.

How do I make my dough more solid? ›

(Tip: add a tiny bit of sugar with each tablespoon of flour to keep the sweet taste.) If you're feeling extra hopeless, try adding the flour and then placing the dough in the fridge to harden up. This method works for dough that isn't runny, so it can do wonders for dough that needs a little more help.

What are sweet rolls made of? ›

A sweet roll or sweet bun refers to any of a number of sweet, baked, yeast-leavened breakfast or dessert foods. They may contain spices, nuts, candied fruits, etc., and are often glazed or topped with icing. Compared to regular bread dough, sweet roll dough generally has higher levels of sugar, fat, eggs, and yeast.

How do you make Old Fashioned butter? ›

All you do is pour your cream into your old-fashioned butter churner. Then you just crank away. The butter churner will first turn your cream into whipped cream. Eventually, the fat will separate from the liquid (the buttermilk).

What is the best pastry in the Philippines? ›

Tasty Filipino Pastries You Should Know About
  • Pan de Sal. This traditional bread of the Philippines is semi-sweet and only made with eggs, flour, salt, sugar and yeast. ...
  • Siopao. One of the most widely recognized Filipino pastries is siopao. ...
  • Puto. ...
  • Bibingka. ...
  • Ensaymada. ...
  • Hopia.
15 May 2014

What is the English name of pandesal? ›

A soft and airy flour roll, pandesal —€” which is sometimes spelled out as "pan de sal" —€” is Spanish for "salt bread." However, contrary to its name, the bread is actually relatively sweet. The yeast-raised bread is similar to the Mexican bolillo, and is the breakfast bread of choice throughout the Philippines.

What is the best Filipino dish? ›

Adobo. The most popular Filipino food and referred to as the unofficial national dish of the Philippines, Adobo is commonly chicken (though pork is a 2nd favourite option) simmered in vinegar, garlic, black peppercorns, soy sauce, and bay leaves.

What is the oldest bakery in Philippines? ›

Dimas Alang 1919: The Oldest Bakery in the Philippines.

What is the oldest food in the Philippines? ›

Probably the oldest group of food crops in the Philippines, root crops includes yams, taros, sweet potato and manioc. Although rice has already replaced yams and taros as the preferred root crop, it still remains as the dominant food in some regions and has assumed complementary roles in others.

What is the most commonly used bread? ›

The Most Commonly Used Bread for Sandwiches
  • White Bread. White bread is as classic as it gets. ...
  • Baguette. Baguettes are texturally exciting. ...
  • Ciabatta. Ciabatta is Italy's answer to baguettes. ...
  • Sourdough. As the name suggests, sourdough is known for having a tangy flavor and an ultra-chewy texture. ...
  • Milk Bread. ...
  • Pandesal.

What makes bread good quality? ›

Free from cracks and bulges. Texture. . . . . . . Slightly moist, tender and Moist, tender and light Soft, springy texture, flaky crumb, with a medium crumb, with medium fine, tender and slightly moist fine grain. evenly distributed air with fine grain, thin- spaces.

Why is bread called Tasty Philippines? ›

The Tasty is the general term Filipinos use for the American Pullman Loaf sliced bread. It got the name Tasty because most local neighborhood bakeries often wrap the loaf breads in a plastic package which is labeled “Tasty Bread”.

What is the most popular baked product in the Philippines? ›

1. Pan de Sal or Pandesal. The most humble of Filipino breads is also the most popular: pandesal, which is made simply with eggs, flour, salt, sugar, and yeast. Created in the Philippines in the 16th century, pandesal has become a part of the traditional Filipino breakfast.

What is Ensaymada in English? ›

WHAT IS ENSAYMADA? Ensaymada is a brioche bread that has its origins from the Spanish Ensaïmada. While the Spanish Ensaïmada traditionally uses saïm, reduced pork lard, in the Philippines, the brioche is butter based.

How much is pandesal in the Philippines? ›

50 to P5 apiece, depending on the size, in community bakeries, Chavez said.

What is the bread of salt in Filipino? ›

"Pandesal or Bread of Salt (which is also the title of a popular short story written by NVM Gonzales) is probably the most popular bread in the Philippines. Pandesal is the favorite “agahan or almusal” (breakfast food) of most Filipinos. Pandesal can eaten plain or with filling.

Why pandesal is the best? ›

Pandesal is the most popular bread in the Philippines for a good reason! With a golden, crumb-coated exterior, slightly sweet taste, and soft, fluffy texture, this Filipino-style bread roll is delicious on its own or with your choice of filling. Perfect for breakfast or as a snack!

What is the most important ingredient in Spanish food? ›

Olive Oil. This is perhaps the most important of all the ingredients to be used in Spanish cooking. It's usually the first ingredient to hit the cooking pan, and it's used to give the finishing touches.

What is the most common ingredient in Spanish food? ›

Olive oil. Since this staple is used in every Spanish dish you can think of, it's the most important ingredient in the kitchen and you want to make sure it's the best quality.

What is classic Spanish food? ›

Spanish cuisine is probably best known for various Spanish tapas (cold or hot Spanish appetizers or snacks) including world-famous national foods of Spain like iconic jamon iberico, legendary paella, and glorified gazpacho.

What is Spanish people's Favourite food? ›

1 – Paella

Our first stop takes us to a dish that is not only famous in Spain but also worldwide. Paella comes from the beautiful city of Valencia. It's a Spanish rice dish that uses a distinct type of rounded rice. Paella de marisco, or seafood paella, is the most common variation.

What are ingredients in bread? ›

The principal ingredients in all bread are: Flour. Yeast. Salt.
...
Yeast
  • produce carbon dioxide gas to enable the dough to rise.
  • expand the dough's cellular network to form bread crumb.
  • give bread its characteristic flavor and aroma.

How do you describe bread in Spanish? ›

The perfect sandwich contains: Bread – el pan. Cheese – el queso.

What is the concha topping made of? ›

Streusel Topping:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature. 2/3 cup white granulated sugar. 1 cup all-purpose flour. 1 teaspoons pure vanilla extract.

What are torrijas made of? ›

Torrija is traditionally made from thick slices of stale bread dipped in a mixture of milk, eggs and sugar, before frying it on both sides until golden brown and dusted with cinnamon and sugar. I like to make my torrija with brioche instead of standard white bread, it makes the torrija more special.

What is Senorita bread made of? ›

Senorita bread is often called Spanish bread in the Philippines. They are small, oblong rolls made of enriched bread dough slathered with butter, sugar and breadcrumbs. The dough is rolled up, sprinkled with more sugared breadcrumbs and baked. The finished bread has a base of buttery caramel that is hard to forget.

What is Manakish bread made of? ›

Manakish (Cheese and Za'atar) A Middle Eastern flatbread made with a soft dough and topped with either a mix of cheese and nigella seeds or a Za'atar and olive oil blend. A delicious way to start your day - always with a cup of tea.

What is a concha called in English? ›

Conchas are a popular type of pan dulce (or Mexican sweet bread) that's commonly sold in panaderias (or bakeries) across the U.S. and Mexico. The word 'concha' translates to 'shell' in English, which describes their fun seashell-like appearance.

What flavor is the white concha? ›

Traditionally, the bread roll itself is not flavored, but the cookie dough topping is classically flavored either with vanilla or chocolate. The cookie dough can be colored or flavored with anything. While the topping can be scored or decorated in many different ways, the cookie dough cover is an essential element.

What is the most eaten dessert in Spain? ›

Flan. Spanish flan is a caramel pudding made from a simple mixture of milk, sugar and eggs. You'll see it served in almost every bar and restaurant in Madrid and beyond, making it the king of all desserts from Spain.

Why is it called French toast? ›

The French did not invent French toast. Rather, it was Americans who gave the name "French Toast" to this dish because French immigrants in America popularized the dishe. In fact, French toast was invented long before France even existed.

What is toast with egg in the middle called? ›

Egg in a Hole is a piece of toast that has a soft cooked egg in the center, which has been cut out. This popular breakfast has many names, like Toad in a Hole, but this egg in toast recipe is delicious no matter what name you call it!

What is the English name of zaatar? ›

Zaatar or Za'tar (zaah-tar) is a common noun in the Arabic language and refers to both a Middle-Eastern herb spice mixture and also a distinct herb plant in the mint family. The herbal plant is referred to in English as bible hyssop or Syrian oregano, but the mixture is just called Zaatar.

What is zaatar mix used for? ›

Some spice mixes are one-trick ponies, but the uses for za'atar are endless. Often it is baked into flatbread, mixed with olive oil or tahini to make a dip, tossed into salads, rubbed onto meat, or sprinkled over hummus.

What is fatayer made of? ›

Fatayer
TypeMeat pie
Region or stateEgypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Iran, Palestine, Syria, Israel, Yemen
Main ingredientsMeat, spinach, cheese or Za'atar
1 more row

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